Category: Treatments for Chronic Respiratory Disease

People often worry about the risk of complication or even death when undergoing general anesthesia for major surgery, but the risk of hospital-acquired postoperative pneumonia is another serious concern, especially following major abdominal surgery. A new study, though, has shown a way to cut that risk in half. When patients practiced breathing exercises immediately after surgery, the incidence of pneumonia was reduced by 50%. Researchers cond
male patient and female doctor
In this video, part of a continuing series produced by Medscape, Dr. Laura Feemster of the University of Washington discusses the risks of comorbidities, or companion diseases, in patients with COPD. These include coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat), obesity, diabetes, depression, and obstructive sleep apnea. Even if you have mild COPD, you have an increased risk of death from these other conditions
A COPD exacerbation can be defined as an increase in symptoms above the day-to-day variability that a patient normally experiences, that requires a change in therapy. In simple terms, it is a COPD “flare-up."  Frequent exacerbations are associated with poorer health, disease progression, and increased mortality; in short, they negatively affect overall quality of life. The first step in treating exacerbations is to figure out what’s trigg
What if one simple thing could decrease your mortality risk from lung cancer by 26%? Or by 61%? Amazingly, a screening chest CT scan can lower mortality by 26% for men and by 61% for women, according to a large randomized European study called NELSON. Harry J. de Koning, MD, Ph.D., of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, reported the results of the study at the World Conference on Lung Cancer. In the study, investigators i
In this video about tailoring therapies to improve the lives of COPD patients, David Au, M.D. talks about improvements in the treatment of COPD, due in part to the number of therapies that are available and also due in no small measure to the patient engagement that some of these therapies involve. Laura Feemster, M.D. adds that medical providers are learning to focus on the patients’ symptoms and exacerbation frequency rather than simply the s