• Rita wants to know what the recommended number of breaths per minute is and why swimming would make one so winded. The number of breaths you take per minute depends mostly on your activity level at the time and also on the degree and type of pulmonary disease you may or may not have. If you have emphysema, the loss of elasticity and air trapping make it important for you to breath OUT longer than you breathe in, usually about 2 or 3 or 4 times as long as you breathe in. That will slow your respiratory rate down a great deal, maybe as slow as 12 breaths a minute at rest or even less when you do pursed lip breathing. However, you need to go by what feels comfortable.
  • Swimming may make you more winded than other exercises because you are using some of the same muscles that you use to breathe with. Because of the air trapping in your lungs you may find it more difficult to swim underwater but a lot easier to float. Have you noticed this?
  • Swimming is a great exercise, even if you are on oxygen. You can put you portable oxygen container on the side of the pool, get a 50 foot hose and do laps, exercise or play as long as you wish. This is especially good exercise for those with arthritis or asthma. Don't forget that sun block if you are swimming outside!
  • Donations continue to come in for the Mary Nicolas Lynch memorial Chair donations from Mr. & Mrs. C. Paul Jones, Geraldine Rutledge, Molly Lynch, Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Lynch, and Bryan McKenzie.
  • Other memorial donations were made by Mary Gallagher in memory of Geneva McGrath. James Lynch in memory of Charlotte O'Brien, Mary Burns and the PEP Pioneers in memory of Evelyn Bangert and Anna Gage, and Betty Ellis in memory of Bob James.

  • The following is the presentation that Dr. Thomas L. Petty gave as he concluded the Respiratory Rally for Research at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center on June 22nd, 2001. We reprint it here.