• The Oxy-View and the LifeStyle Oxygen Delivery Devices
  • Most people who use supplemental oxygen use a nasal cannula, which loops around the ears and enters the nose. But some don't like how they look when wearing a nasal cannula. Installing the tubing into eyeglasses has been used for oxygen delivery since oxygen outside the hospital was first prescribed. Older versions were clumsy, large and never became popular. The new Oxy-View glasses look like any that a patient may already be using with a prescription. They come in several versions appropriate for men or for women and your prescription can be used to replace the plain glass they come with. Dr. Petty told us that he used the Oxy-View glasses at a conference he recently attended and very few of the physicians realized that he was now on oxygen. He adds that the Oxy-View glasses are very comfortable and take the pressure off the ears.
  • Oxy-View also works with the Helios double lumen, but with oxygen flow going in only one nostril. Dr. Petty published an article about this in Respiratory Care back in 1973 demonstrating that this is just as effective as having the flow in two nostrils. The added advantage is that if one nostril gets irritated, you can switch the sensing flow tube of the double lumen tube to the other side.
  • For his personal use, Dr. Petty has just designed Oxy-Snooz eyewear. This is his name for installing J-tubes in airline eyeshades, so he doesn't have to wear glasses to bed. He is also designing something for mouth breathers when nasal prongs or the Oxy-View J-tubes won't work. We'll look forward to hearing more about this later!
  • Most patients wearing the Oxy-View extend their oxygen tubing down their back, though they may also use it under their chin. There is a one-year warrantee and full 30-day money back guarantee on each purchase to return the glasses, or to exchange them for another style. Prices range up to a maximum of $249.95 for the newest half rim glasses. For more information visit the website at http://www.oxyview.com or call 1-877-OXYVIEW (877-699-8439).
  • The LifeStyle is 9.75-pound battery powered oxygen concentrator developed by AirSep. It provides an FIO2 of 95% at up to the equivalent of five liters per minute. There is a rechargeable battery, which lasts about 45 minutes at a flow rate of 2 liters/minute. It recharges again in two hours using AC or DC currents as well as the cigarette lighter in the car. When not being carried around, it can be continuously recharged in car, home, or office. It uses a conserver, and is sold by dealers directly to patients. Since it costs between $4,000 and $5,000 it may be a possibility for the affluent but is not yet much of an option for people on a fixed low income. One problem with this unit, besides the short battery life, is that it cannot be switched to continuous oxygen, which is a real disadvantage for many of our patients. Never the less, this technology is a real advance, and they are currently working on a battery that will last 2 hours.
  • AirSep says that it has passed compliance testing for a number of regulatory bodies. It is said to perform well up to and altitude of 10,000 feet.
  • It can be plugged into the computer terminals in the plane cabins, and can be kept on during take off and landing. It does not change the level of oxygen in the cabin of aircraft, of course.
  • Although portable concentrators are not yet allowed to be used during commercial air flights, AirSep tells us that they are working closely with the airlines, various organizations such as NAMDARC, AACVPR and their lobbyists, and feel they are close to getting the LifeStyle accepted for in-flight use by patients. The airlines say they are anxious to get out of the oxygen business. With all the safety testing this product has been passed, maybe we finally will have some good news for our patients who fly.
  • The AirSep phone number is 1-800-874-0202 and their website is http://www.airsep.com. We know that other companies are also working on manufacturing portable oxygen concentrators. So, keep posted for more news, and stay well until next time.

  • Do you have a question about respiratory disease that has been bothering you? If so, feel free to write and ask us, either through our web site or by mail. We answer all of your letters.