• Donations were made to PERF in memory of Robert Allen McDonald by Lisa Risley, Jane Garfield, Christine Chigas, Ray & Theres Kubiak, John & Kathy Biesiada, Charles & Patrica Brothers, Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Sousounis, Pat Helfrich and Wm. Giannopoulos. Virginia Elson made a donation in memory of David Elson, Lois Skidmore in memory of Jack Bauman and Hilda Swanson in memory of her husband, Albert. Please accept our deepest sympathies on your loss.

  • Do you need some good books for your pulmonary library? Here are 3 that we would like to highly recommend to you today.
  • 1. The 3rd edition of ENJOYING LIFE WITH COPD written by Dr. Tom Petty and Louise Nett is a 200 page booklet yours for only $10 including shipping. A real bargain! Call 1 (303) 839-6755 or e-mail lberteau@aol.com. Checks should be made payable to Thomas L. Petty, MD and mailed to 1850 High St., Denver, CO 80218.
  • 2. Better Breathers TRAVELER, written by the ALA of San Diego and Imperial Counties is 55 pages of great travel information. Telephone (619) 297-3901, e-mail Kathy@lungsandiego.org or send a $12 check to ALA of San Diego a & Imperial Counties, 2750 4th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103.
  • 3. The 2001 edition of Breath' Easy, compiled by Jerry Gorby, is hot off the press with a listing of places all around the world where you can obtain oxygen. This is a wonderful companion to the Better Breathers TRAVELER and a must for reference libraries in rehab programs. Call toll-free at 888-699-4360 or e-mail gorby@mymailstation.com for further information.
  • Do you remember that last month we had an article by Craig Murga about oxygen from concentrators vs. liquid? We didn't have room to finish it. As promised, here is the second part of Craig's article. Refer to the January newsletter for part one. To continue…..
  • Another problem that can occur with different types of oxygen delivery devices is a condition of perception. For those who use supplemental oxygen an important sensory organ is the nose. Over time the flow of oxygen passing through the nose is a conditional response that equates the feeling of airflow with the feeling of well being. In other words, when you're short of breath, the oxygen flow provides you with relief.
  • This phenomenon was well understood years ago when we had concentrators that would fail very quickly. Concentrators checks would turn up all the time with oxygen purity reading of 21%, the same as room air. Back then, the frequency of servicing these units was every 4-6 weeks to try to catch this problem. But what we always found was that the person using the oxygen was totally unaware they were not receiving any oxygen.
  • We can also see this conditioned response happen with an oxygen delivery device called the enricher system. These units only put out 40% oxygen purity, but deliver a flow at twice the liter flow of a concentrator. We would see patients who used enricher units, and also used cylinder gas, adjusting the flow to match the other unit. This conditioned response can really throw oxygen users for a loop when they try out, or switch around from, concentrators, liquid systems, or cylinder gas.
  • Concentrators have a working pressure of 20 psi, (pounds per square inch) as do some liquid oxygen systems. Other liquid oxygen systems work at 50 psi like cylinder gas. So, using different types of delivery devices can cause a very real problem with perception. To help those using oxygen better understand this cause and effect relationship, I typically will try to explain it in this crude fashion. If you turn on a garden hose with a spray nozzle at the end, it would appear the flow is much greater than it is without the nozzle. But, if you place one hose with a nozzle over a bucket, and another hose without a nozzle over a different bucket, both would fill up the buckets at the same rate. The only thing that changed in the process was the pressure, not the liter flow. The problem of perception many time leaves the oxygen user feeling as if they're getting better oxygen from one device than from other devices. But the reality of this is that the body's level of oxygen saturation is dependent on inspired gas not perception. Many times just knowing how this works helps people to overcome how they feel with different oxygen delivery devices.
  • Thanks again, Craig! Hope that answers some of the questions that we have been getting.
  • This is from our friend Ann Wentink
  • Smiling is infectious, you catch it like the flu.
  • When someone smiled at me today, I started smiling too.
  • I passed around the corner and someone saw my grin.
  • When he smiled I realized I'd passed it on to him.
  • I thought about that smile, then I realized its worth.
  • A single smile, just like mine, could travel round the earth.
  • So, if you feel a smile begin, don't leave it undetected.
  • Lets start the epidemic quick, and get the world infected!